Death and your pension

After you die, your spouse, other beneficiaries and/or your estate may be paid their portion of your pension benefit.


When you die, your pension can provide financial support for your family and other people or organizations important to you. BC's Public Service Pension Plan may pay a death benefit (a monthly amount or lump-sum payment) to your spouse or other beneficiaries you've named.

The amount of the death benefit depends on:

  • Your age at death
  • If you die before you retire
  • Who you named as beneficiary

Shortened life expectancy

If you are an active member   of the plan and have a shortened life expectancy,   you may be able to access your pension benefit early. Contact the plan for more information.
 

If you die before you retire

If you die before you retire and have pension contributions on deposit with the plan, your beneficiary(ies) will be paid a death benefit.
 

Your spouse is automatically your beneficiary unless they've given up their right to a pre-retirement death benefit. This means, if you die before you retire and:

  • Before your earliest retirement age (under 55 for most members or 50 for those working in designated public safety occupations), your spouse is eligible for one of the following:
    • an immediate monthly pension, payable for their lifetime
    • a lump-sum payment equal to the greater value of your contributions with interest or the commuted value   of your pension benefit
  • After your earliest retirement age, your spouse is only eligible to receive an immediate monthly pension, payable for their lifetime

If you do not have a spouse or your spouse has given up their beneficiary right to the pre-retirement death benefit, your named beneficiaries will receive a death benefit equal to the greater of:

  • Your contributions with interest
  • The commuted value of your pension benefit

If you do not have a spouse and have not named a beneficiary through the plan or in your will, the pre-retirement death benefit is paid to your estate.

If you die after you retire

Depending on the pension option you chose when you retired, your pension may be paid to your beneficiary(ies)   as a monthly pension for a set period (or their lifetime) or as a lump-sum payment.
 

For example, if you chose:

  • A single life pension with a guarantee period, and you die before that period expires – your monthly pension will continue to be paid to your beneficiary(ies) until the end of the guarantee period, or they may choose to receive a lump-sum payment
  • A 100% joint life pension, and you die before your spouse – your monthly pension will continue to be paid to your spouse for their lifetime
  • A joint life pension with a guarantee period, and you die before that period expires – your monthly pension will be paid to your spouse until the end of the guarantee period, after which the joint life percentage will be paid to your spouse for their lifetime

If your beneficiary is an organization, any remaining monthly pension payments will be paid to the organization as a lump sum.

Your spouse and dependent children may be eligible for extended health care and dental coverage through the plan. Certain conditions apply, and coverage is not guaranteed.

If you are age 65 or younger when you die, a group life insurance benefit may be available to your beneficiaries if you chose this option when you retired. Contact BC Public Service Agency's MyHR toll-free at 1-877-277-0772.

Paying death benefits to a former spouse

If you and your former spouse had a complete, signed separation agreement or registered court order outlining how to divide your pension, we will follow those terms when paying any death benefits.


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